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Man Booker Prize List

This is the list of Man Booker Prize winners. The ones I have read are either hyperlinked or crossed out (pre-blogging).

1969. Something to Answer For by PH Newby
1970. The Elected Member by Bernice Rubens
1971.In a Free State, by V.S. Naipaul
1972. G by John Berger
1973. The Siege of Krishnapur by JG Farrell (TBR)
1974. Holiday by Stanley Middleton
1974. The Conservationist by Nadine Gordimer
1975. Heat and Dust by Ruth Prawer Jhabvala
1976. Saville by David Storey
1977. Staying On by Paul Scott
1978. The Sea, The Sea by Iris Murdoch
1979. Offshore by Penelope Fitzgerald
1980. Rites of Passage by William Golding (TBR)
1981.Midnight’s Children by Salman Rushdie (Read along host in November 2010 – Booker of Booker)
1982. Schindler’s Ark by Thomas Keneally
1983. Life & Times of Michael K by JM Coetzee
1984. Hotel Du Lac, Anita Brookner
1985. The Bone People by Keri Hulme
1986. The Old Devils by Kingsley Amis
1987. Moon Tiger by Penelope Lively
1988. Oscar and Lucinda by Peter Carey (TBR)
1989. The Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro
1990. Possession by A.S. Byatt (TBR)
1991. The Famished Road by Ben Okri (TBR)
1992. Sacred Hunger by Barry Unsworth (shared)
1992. The English Patient by Michael Ondaatje (shared) (TBR)
1993. Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha by Roddy Doyle
1994. How late it was, how late by James Kelman
1995. The Ghost Road by Pat Barker
1996. Last Orders by Graham Swift
1997. The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy
1998. Amsterdam by Ian McEwan (TBR)
1999. Disgrace, J.M. Coetzee
2000. The Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood (TBR)
2001. The History of the Kelly Gang by Peter Carey (TBR)
2002. Life of Pi by Yann Martel
2003. Vernon God Little by DBC Pierre
2004. The Line of Beauty by Alan Hollinghurst
2005. The Sea by John Banville
2006. Inheritance of Loss by Kiran Desai (TBR)
2007. The Gathering, Anne Enright
2008 The White Tiger, Aravind Adiga
2009 Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel
2010 The Finkler Question by Howard Jacobson
2011 The Sense of Ending by Julian Barnes

Books read: 9/44 = 20%

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Ratings Defined

0 = Abandon the book after first chapter

1 = Waste of paper, we will see what the environmentalist say about this!

2 = Skip it, read the book if you have got nothing better to do

2.5 = An average book, easily forgettable.

3 = A good read.

3.5 = A good entertaining read, a page-turner

4 = So glad that I read the book, a book with substance and invaluable for future reference

4.5 = So glad that I read the book, would pester everyone to read it, invaluable, I would want to own it and wouldn't mind a second read (something that I seldom do)

5 = The book is so good that I feel like I am on scale 4 and 4.5, and more, it blew me away and lingers on my head for weeks!

2013 Reading Challenge

Books Read

JoV's bookshelf: read
Hold Tight
The Fault in Our Stars
The Everything Store: Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon
The Thief
Mockingjay
Catching Fire
A Tale for the Time Being
Into the Darkest Corner
The Liars' Gospel
Goat Mountain
Strange Weather In Tokyo
Strange Shores
And the Mountains Echoed
Ten White Geese
One Step Too Far
The Innocents
The General: The ordinary man who became one of the bravest prisoners in Guantanamo
White Dog Fell from the Sky
A Virtual Love
The Fall of the Stone City


JoV's favorite books »
Share book reviews and ratings with JoV, and even join a book club on Goodreads.
old-books

Reading, after a certain age, diverts the mind too much from its creative pursuits. Any man who reads too much and uses his own brain too little falls into lazy habits of thinking. - Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955)

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